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2013 Dubai Round 2: Tomas Berdych vs Tobias Kamke

Posted on February 27, 2013 at 2:00 PM
 
 
 

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H2H Tomas Berdych vs Tobias Kamke

 
 
 
 
 




 
 
 







 
 
 

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Berdych wins in centre-stage sun in Dubai

 
 
 



 
 

 

 
 

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Tomas Berdych saved 12 of 14 break points to advance on Wednesday.

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 


DUBAI DUTY FREE TENNIS CHAMPIONSHIPS 2013


Berdych Cruises Into Fourth QF Of Season


by ATP Staff | 27.02.2013


Tomas Berdych saved 12 of 14 break points to advance on Wednesday.


Third seed Tomas Berdych reached his fourth ATP World Tour quarter-final in as many tournaments on Wednesday with a 7-5, 6-1 win over Tobias Kamke of Germany at the Dubai Duty Free Tennis Championships.


Berdych is coming off a runner-up finish at the Open 13 in Marseille (l. to Tsonga) and has a 12-3 match record on the season. He won 31 of his 39 first service points and saved 12 of 14 break points against Kamke.


German qualifier Daniel Brands overcame eighth-seeded Russia and two-time finalist Mikhail Youzhny, making his 13th appearance at the event, 6-4, 6-4 in 64 minutes.







 
 
 
 
 
 

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 Tomas Berdych reaches 4th ATP Quarterfinal in a row at Dubai

 




 

 

 

 


Tomas Berdych survives but calls for rule change


Berdych emerged both relieved and disgruntled after surviving 7-5, 6-1 against the world number 90, which carried him laboriously into the quarter-finals of the tournament.


World number six Tomas Berdych on Wednesday overcame jet-lag, an umpire's warning and a difficult first set against tenacious German Tobias Kamke at the Dubai Open before calling for changes to the time limit rule.


Berdych emerged both relieved and disgruntled after surviving 7-5, 6-1 against the world number 90, which carried him laboriously into the quarter-finals of the tournament.


The Czech contested the Marseille final 3,000 miles (4,800 kilometres) away on Sunday and struggled in the first set, saving 12 break points, dropping serve twice and three times being within one blow of being taken to a tie-break.


With Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, his Marseille conqueror, having been similarly jaded during a first round loss to Michael Llodra, there was a distinct sense that Berdych was in danger from multiple pressures.


One of them was the new 25-second time rule, which reduces by five seconds the permitted pause between rallies, and which annoyed Berdych when it was imposed on him during his most difficult moments.


"I don't like it. I'm not a fan of it. I don't see any single reason why to have this rule," he said. "What could be positive on this? What could work? What could be advantage?"


The conventional answer is improving the situation for spectators by speeding up the game, which has on average had only 20 minutes in an hour when there is action.


Berdych, though, was sardonic about his transgressions.


"I get like a six or seven (warnings) in Chennai and then I did not get one in Marseille and now I just get only warning. So I'm improving," he said dryly.


Berdych's criticisms were directed also towards arbitrary impositions of the rule.


"It should be more clear what's going on, because the referee has so much power on you," he claimed.


"He can do whatever he wants. If you have like 25 (seconds) and he has a bad day, or he doesn't like you, it's 24 and you go.


"I mean, it's so simple. Let's put the clock there and then everybody goes by the clock. Simple as that if they want to go straight."


Berdych also found it hard to continue adapting from indoor courts in Europe to the warm sun and wind in the Gulf. He tried to compensate by focusing hard and tried to take pleasure merely in making it to the last eight.




 

 




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Tomas' winning shoes









February 27, 2013


DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES


T. BERDYCH/T. Kamke

7‑5, 6‑1



THE MODERATOR:  Questions, please.


Q.  So you had quite a lot of trouble from him in the first set and early in the second.  How did you turn it around and why was it so tough?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  Well, I mean, I was struggling a bit with the conditions, because it's still kind of my first days here because, you know, even though I had a match yesterday it was yesterday night, and always the night matches help, you know, when you come and transition from indoors to outdoors.  It's easier to play in the night because you don't have that blue sky and sun.  It's actually not too much windy.

Today actually I got everything from that.  You know, it was quite tough for me.  But, you know, I'm able to manage it in two sets, which is good.  Yeah, another day behind me.  Looking forward to go next one.


Q.  Last week we see in the women's draw a lot of the women, particularly Serena and Victoria, pull out given that they had back‑to‑back tournaments, Doha and then here.  You have obviously come straight from Marseilles.  How are you feeling physically?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  Well, I wish to have tournaments Doha and Dubai and be comparing this week to week.  I think it's just great schedule.  But, you know, that's how it is, okay.

Sorry, what was that?


Q.  How are you feeling after coming straight from Marseilles?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  Well, as you imagine, you know, this is quite tough one to come back from indoors and, you know, basically fly, came in the night, and next day playing your first match outdoors.  This is something what I never done before because, you know, the schedule was for me working differently.

But, you know, it's my first experience.  So it's nice to getting new, unusual situation in my career.


Q.  You obviously did well to save ‑‑you saved 12 of 14 break points.  Talk about that.  He put you under pressure, but when it mattered you were able to get the job done.

TOMAS BERDYCH:  Yeah.  I mean, it would be better if this number would be less, but the other hand, you know, if it would be less then he would be more successful and then it would be much worse.  I'm happy with that, you know.  I don't care.

The score should be probably even easier.  I had a 5‑3 serve in the first set, and I was not able to manage that and some other break points.  But whatever.  I mean, it's way how to do it.  Just try to win the last point.  That's all what is matter.


Q.  After a couple of matches and like getting used to the conditions, is Dubai a place that you like to play in?  Are you okay with the surface and everything?  Does it suit your game?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  Well, yeah.  I mean, as I look back, I mean, I had some semifinal and quarterfinal and quarterfinal this year.  So, yes, it's going with solid results.

As I come here I want to do a bit better, so, you know, I will try to prepare again, try to be better and be stronger for the next match.

Well, yeah, as you mentioned, the conditions I think is very fast.  You know, even the court‑‑ maybe the court is not that extremely fast, but once you have it really hot in the straight sun it really makes, you know, the balls fly much more than I'm used to.

But that's the same for everybody, so I just need to hurry up to get used to it, as well, and be ready with them.


Q.  You said in your interview on court that you didn't‑‑ you know, finding your rhythm, haven't perhaps found your best tennis here as yet.  You're into the quarterfinals.  How big a threat are you now to the rest of the draw?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  Well, I hope big enough or I will try to be big enough.  (Laughter.)

Yeah, I mean, this is nice about the tennis, because I can mention so many tournaments that I have been playing absolutely fantastic since the first round, and then, you know, all of a study lost second round or something like that.

Then the other hand actually this is for me more ‑‑I appreciate this more, you know, because then you have to be there, you have to be really focused, have to really fight for every point.  It's not easy.  Sometimes you would make a mistake that you would like just ‑‑you know, doesn't want to be on the court and that's how it is.

But then in the end when you win the match, then it's like, yeah, the feeling is better.


Q.  When could you get your new outfit from H&M?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  Well, actually, they are making the line which is gonna be just like my personal line, and it's going to be ready in the summer.  I hope very beginning of the summer.  Actually, this is all the stuff I'm using, it's from them.

It's kind of their decision, and I have been told that it should be very soon.  Hopefully any next week I'm expecting the same.


Q.  You still keep the shoe contract with Nike?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  Oh, yeah, yeah, of course.  This is not a brand that's going to be making any shoes.  I mean, this is something what is very important, and as you can see, there are many, many guys and many companies that they doesn't do it like that, and, for example, you know, Uniqlo with Novak is the same thing.

Yeah, I will stay with the shoes that I'm used to.


Q.  You also talked ‑‑you were asked on court about the new timing rule.  Getting used to it?  What's your thoughts on it?  Do you think it's the right way to go?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  Well, I mean, I get like a six‑ or seven‑second serve in Chennai, and then I did not get one in Marseilles, and now I just get only warning.  So I'm improving.  That's a good thing.  (Smiling.)

The other thing is that I don't like it.  I'm not a fan of it.  I don't see any single reason why to have this rule.  What could be positive on this?  What could work?  What could be advantage?

If they want to go like that, then I think there should be more, like more clear than what's going on, because like that, you know, the referee have so much power on you.  He can do whatever he want.  That's just like ‑‑ you know, you have 25 seconds.  If you have like 25 and something, whatever, you know, he just said ‑‑or 24 and‑‑ you know.  He has a bad day, he doesn't like you, 24 and you go.

I mean, it's so simple.  Why?  Let's put the clock there, and then everybody goes by the clock.  Simple as that if they want to go straight.

I mean, I had so much ‑‑I was waiting for the guy, and I was like, What's going on?  The referee didn't say nothing.  You know, I don't like it at all.


Q.  So you feel in the tournaments you have played this year it's been inconsistent?  Sometimes it's been abided by the clock and sometimes not?  Is it fair to say it's been inconsistent?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  Yeah.  I mean, it's really inconsistent.  The other hand, I mean, it's not matter only on my serve.  I mean, what should I do with the ball boy?  Should I run to pick up the ball instead of him or what should I do?

I mean, you just stand there waiting for the ball, just waiting for the guy.  What you can do?  The time is running.

And then the referee like tell me, like, Hey, I will talk to them, like they are slow.  But first I have to give you a warning.

Like how is this working?  I mean, first they should talk to the ball boys to be faster and then tell me, okay, that I'm doing late, late.  I will try to speed it up and then we can go.

But, I mean, why?  You give a warning.  I mean, same example:  You're going in the car and the police stop you and say you were overspeeding.  You said, Okay.  How much I went?

Oh, 65.  Here it's only 50.

How should I know it when you don't have a speedometer in your car?  It's the same thing.


Q.  How many warnings did you get today?  Just two?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  One only.


Q.  One only?

TOMAS BERDYCH:  One only.



FastScripts Transcript by ASAP Sports







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