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2012 US Open Semi-Final: Tomas Berdych vs Andy Murray

Posted on September 6, 2012 at 4:10 PM



Sixth seed Tomas Berdych is looking to become the third Czech man to reach the US Open final after Jan Kodes (1971, 1973) and Ivan Lendl (1982-89). In 2010, he lost to Rafael Nadal in the Wimbledon title match. The 26-year-old Winston-Salem Open runner-up is guaranteed to equal his career-high World No. 6 ranking on Monday.


Berdych leads Murray 2-1 in hard-court meetings. This will be their third clash this year, after Murray won at the Dubai Duty Free Tennis Championships and Berdych triumphed at the Monte-Carlo Rolex Masters. Murray has a 45-11 record on the season, while Berdych is 46-16 overall in 2012.

 



 
 

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H2H Tomas Berdych vs Andy Murray

 
 
 



Order of Play - Saturday, September 8, 2012

Arthur Ashe Stadium - Match Start At: 11:00 AM


Men's Singles - Semifinals *

Tomas Berdych (CZE) [6] vs Andy Murray (GBR) [3]


Men's Singles - Semifinals **

David Ferrer (ESP) [4] vs Novak Djokovic (SRB) [2]


Not before 7:00 PM - Women's Singles - Finals ***

Victoria Azarenka (BLR) [1] vs Serena Williams (USA) [4]




* Heavy rain have delayed the start of the first semi-final between Murray and Tomas Berdych. Match started at 12:25 p.m.

** suspended due to severe weather, with Ferrer, the No. 4 seed, about to serve for the first set with a 5-2 lead over the defending US Open champion. The Djokovic-Ferrer match will resume at 11 a.m. Sunday in Arthur Ashe Stadium. As a result, the men’s final will be pushed to Monday, Sept. 10, at 4 p.m.

*** The women’s singles final between Serena Williams and Victoria Azarenka, originally scheduled for Saturday night, was postponed earlier in the day to Sunday at 4:30 p.m.

 
 
 
 
 

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Tomas Berdych lost to Andy Murray in US Open semi-final















 

Tomas Berdych celebrates a point during his men's singles semifinal match against Andy Murray of Great Britain on Day Thirteen of the 2012 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 8, 2012 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.














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US OPEN 2012


Murray Tops Berdych To Reach US Open Final


New York, U.S.A.


by ATP Staff | 08.09.2012


Third-seeded Briton Andy Murray advanced to his second US Open final on Saturday after he defeated sixth seed Tomas Berdych of the Czech Republic 5-7, 6-2, 6-1, 7-6(7) in windy conditions for victory in three hours and 58 minutes.


"It's been [a] great [few months],” admitted Murray. “To be in the final and get the chance to play for a Grand Slam is great. My results in the Slams over the last couple of years have been very good. Obviously, this year in the major tournaments, along with the Olympics, it's been my best year. [I have] never made two Grand Slam finals in a year, so that's obviously a good sign that I'm playing better and still learning."


The 25-year-old Murray, who has a 99-27 match record at Grand Slam championships, will contest his fifth major final against second-seeded Serbian and defending champion Novak Djokovic or fourth seed David Ferrer of Spain. "Whatever happens in the final, it's been a great year," said Murray. "But all I want to make sure I do in the final is that I give 110 per cent. I know how hard these opportunities are to come by, and I will give it everything."


Murray, the 2008 runner-up (l. to Federer), is bidding to become the first British man to lift a major trophy since Fred Perry at the 1936 US Championships. Last month, Murray won the singles gold medal at the London 2012 Olympics. “I'm obviously a lot more mature [than in 2008]," said Murray. "I have had a lot more experience in these sort of situations, than obviously then. It was my first [Grand] Slam final.”


After experiencing a delay of 75 minutes, due to a tornado warning and torrential rain, Murray and Berdych walked onto Arthur Ashe Stadium court knowing winds of 25 miles per hour would hinder high-level tennis. As a result, both players exchanged early service breaks. Berdych took his chance at 5-6, converting his second set point opportunity with a forehand winner to end the 77-minute opener.


Murray got off to the best possible start in the 44-minute second set, converting his second of three break point chances and started to dictate play. In the fifth game, Murray hit a net cord winner to open up a 4-1 lead. During the first point at 5-2, Murray’s chair and racquet back blew onto the court just as Berdych was hitting a backhand return. Murray came back from 15/30 to win the set.


Berdych’s service woes continued as the high winds affected his ball toss and Murray earned errors on the Czech’s backhand. Murray had it all how own way, breaking to love in the opening game of the third set; to 30 in the third game, when Berdych mis-timed a forehand wide, and a third break after five deuces in the seventh game.


Murray looked on course for a spot in the final at 3-0, when he nullified Berdych’s power game from behind the baseline. But the Scot lost concentration and Berdych gained the momentum, attacking the net off powerful backhands, to win three straight games. Serving first in the set, Murray came within two points of the match at 5-4.


In the tie-break, Berdych found his rhythm on serve to take a 4-1 lead. But Murray fought back to 5-5, before Berdych created a set point opportunity with a volley winner. Murray saved it with a backhand winner for 6-6 and earned his first match point chance at 7-6. Berdych hit an ace down the middle, but struck a forehand long on the next point. At 8-7, Murray leapt in the air to celebrate after Berdych hit a forehand long.


Murray has now won five of his past six matches against opponents in the Top 10 of the South African Airways ATP Rankings and has a 46-11 match record on the 2012 season. He has won 23 tour-level titles.


Berdych was attempting to become the third Czech man to reach the US Open after Jan Kodes (1971, 1973) and Ivan Lendl (1982-1989). The 26 year old is guaranteed to equal his career-high World No. 6 on Monday. He dropped to a 46-17 season mark.


“[The wind] was really, really tough one,” said Berdych, who committed 62 unforced errors. “He dealt with that much better than I did.”




 
 
 
 
 

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Tomas Berdych in the Men's Semi-Final of the US Open, Flushing, New York. USA. 8th September 2012.




















Girlfriend Ester, Father Martin, Mother Hana, Physio Jose-Felix Gonzalez Castilla

Fitness trainer David Vydra, Coach Tomas Krupa



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Tomas Berdych in action against Andy Murray

 
 
 













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MAT CH REPORT


Murray halts Berdych run, into final


by Clair Maciel (official website US Open)


Saturday, September 8, 2012


Mother Nature created quite the difficult situation for Andy Murray and Tomas Berdych to get through their semifinal contest Saturday afternoon. After a rain-delayed start, high winds swirled around Arthur Ashe Stadium court, prompting the two men to chase down windblown service tosses and commit a combined nine double faults and 84 unforced errors.


After winning the first set and producing a below-par performance for two and a half sets, Berdych suddenly came alive in the middle of the fourth and made a match of it by pushing Murray to a tiebreak. But Berdych's comeback was too little, too late, as Murray advanced into the final and earned another shot at winning the US Open title with a 5-7, 6-2, 6-1, 7-6(7) victory.


The wind was least favorable to Berdych, whose 64 unforced errors proved too costly to win a match at the semifinal level, especially against a consistent player like Murray.


"It was brutal to play in that wind, it's hard to describe," Murray said after the match. "The ball was sometimes stopping, moving the other way, and it was hard to serve, so the focus wasn't really on going for aces, just getting the first serve in. Those are probably the hardest conditions I've ever had to play in."


Berdych went so far as to say that the wind was the main culprit preventing him from playing his game and taking command of his serves.


"The wind was one part of opponent, so it was a really tough one," Berdych said. "It affects my serve a lot because I have a higher toss. When I'm not able to serve, and go for the first serve and I'm not making straight points from the serve, then that's not my game. So actually, it was quite hard to adjust to that, because I'm normally not used to that. Of course I don't like to lose the match, and not a match like this in the semis when I thought that I had a pretty good chance. But, you know, the best word I can say is that the wind blew it away from me."


Throughout the first set, Berdych effectively used his pace and depth to set himself up for net approaches and keep Murray defending behind the baseline. Any attempted lob that came his way at the net, Berdych put away with ease. Murray, on the other hand, couldn't catch a break. Shots that normally would fall in for Murray were sailing just long thanks to a little push from the wind. And when the Brit's hat was blown off during a point he would have won had it not been called a let, he ditched the hat in frustration.


But something changed between the first and second sets. After securing the opening frame, Berdych fell apart early in the second, while Murray raised his game to go up a break. Using a variety of shots and keeping his unforced errors to a minimum, the No. 3 seed raced out to a 5-1 lead. Berdych failed to dictate with his biggest asset, his serve, and not once did he reach a break point on Murray's serve.


The momentum continued in much the same direction in the third set, as the unforced errors continued to pile up for Berdych and Murray implemented his spin shot with success to get ahead two sets to one.


Berdych's confidence had clearly waned, his shots spraying all over the court and his footwork and movement sluggish. By the middle of the fourth set and down 0-3 and facing two break points, Berdych already looked like a man defeated. Then, suddenly, Berdych reeled off three straight games to bring him back to life. From then on, he swung freely, much in the same manner as when he defeated Roger Federer, pushing Murray to a tiebreak.


The first few points were all Berdych, as he took a commanding lead before Murray fought his way back in thrilling fashion to avoid a fifth set and ensure a spot in the finals.


The only time Murray has reached the final here was in 2008, when he lost to Roger Federer. Murray's opponent in the championship has yet to be decided, as the match between David Ferrer and Novak Djokovic had to be suspended until Sunday because of severe weather.












Tomas Berdych’s girlfriend Ester Satorova and Jose-Felix Gonzalez Castilla, his physiotherapist watch his men's singles semifinal match against Andy Murray on Day Thirteen of the 2012 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 8, 2012 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.










 
 
 

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Tomas Berdych in action against Andy Murray
















 
 
 









Ballboys return the chairs to their position on the side of the court after the wind blew them away during the men's singles semifinal match between Tomas Berdych and Andy Murray on Day Thirteen of the 2012 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 8, 2012 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.




















Tomas Berdych returns a shot during his men's singles semifinal match against Andy Murray of Great Britain on Day Thirteen of the 2012 US Open at USTA Billie Jean King National Tennis Center on September 8, 2012 in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York City.

 













 
 
 
 
 

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Tomas Berdych talks about his US Open semi-final loss to Andy Murray on Saturday

 
 
 



U.S. OPEN - Semi-Final


A. MURRAY/T. Berdych

5-7, 6-2, 6-1, 7-6(7)


Saturday, September 8, 2012


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.


Q. How tough were the wind conditions today?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Well, it was one part of opponent, so it was a really tough one.


Q. How did it affect your serve?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Well, it affects a lot because I have a higher toss. You know, then when I'm not able to serve, you know, and go for the first serve and not making some points, straight points from the serve, then, you know, that's not my game. So actually, it was quite hard to adjust to that, because I'm normally not used to that. You know, it was really, really tough one. Yeah, it just happened. He dealed with that much better than I did.


Q. The show must go on, but do you think in this sort of condition the match should be not played, or, I mean, it's impossible because semifinal of a slam, US Open. What do you think?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Yeah, I think that our sport deserved to have some rule or if the conditions are like that that, you know, you don't play because of the rain. We play in Grand Slam in such a big tournament like this one, and especially missing the roof, it's something which should be at least to think about. You know, as you said, I mean, we are here in States where they really love show. Actually, this is not about show. This is just about somehow to try to deal with the conditions and then trying to put ball over the net. Sometimes was even impossible, but that's how it is.


Q. The 62 unforced errors, did the wind contribute to that?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Well, probably did. Well, probably I made like 62 in all the matches before I get to the semifinals, so I don't see any reason that my game would just crash in that part, you know. So it was something what, you know, really affect my game. But that's how it is, you know.


Q. You seemed to make a little bit of an adjustment coming into the net a bit more and found your rhythm. Do you think you went away from that late? Should you have continued to push forward a little more?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Yeah, probably I should little bit more, because, you know, when you push your opponent and coming often to the net, I mean, it's really hard to play passing shot in this kind of weather condition, you know. But also, on the other hand, is also tough, you know, not to make that much mistakes and be aggressive just enough, you know. And then of course it's become that I made more mistakes than I normally does. Yeah, it was something what I want to try to do differently. Actually, I made it a pretty good chance with that. You know, I was quite close in the tiebreak. Unfortunately didn't make it, you know, so who knows? Probably we should still be there and playing the fifth set.


Q. You just stepped off court; tough loss. But months from now, will you look back at the US Open this year as an opportunity lost, or will you look at it as a great run with the victory over Federer?

TOMAS BERDYCH: I mean, of course right now it's sad. Of course I don't like to lose the match, and not the match like this in the semis which I thought that I had a pretty good chance. But, you know, I would say that the best word I can say is that the wind blow it away from me. Yeah, probably in couple of days I can see it positively that I made the semis, played a great match against Roger, and just go forward.


Q. You mentioned that you don't think this match should have been played given the conditions. Was there any conversation with officials about perhaps not playing this match today?

TOMAS BERDYCH: No.


Q. No?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Nobody cares.


Q. How do you think that Andy handled things? You earlier referenced him handling the conditions a little bit better than you did. Do you feel that was throughout? Did he adjust a little bit better, you think?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Yeah, I think he is the one actually ‑‑ well, there is not a player who likes these conditions, but there are some players that, you know, these kind of conditions can suit to their game a bit better than the other ones. That's the difference, you know. Well, yeah, Andy was better in this part definitely, and that's why he actually took the win.


Q. The reason why all the Czech and Slovak players always have these huge stars. You cannot change, you cannot adjust ‑ of course not at the last minute ‑ the Australian player that used the wind, they were always having a low toss. You all have a very huge, long toss. There is no way that you can do something about it when you have conditions like this? I know it's difficult to improvise, but...

TOMAS BERDYCH: Well, I don't think so. You know, that's something what you are doing since you are a kid.


Q. Yeah, but why all of you?

TOMAS BERDYCH: I don't know. That's the Czech school probably. I don't know. If you look for the Spanish guys, they like to play more Spain more rallies. Cannot ask why, just you. Probably just kind of a part of the game that it belongs to us, and that's it. Well, the good thing is that this kind of weather is not quite often, which is at least good. Well, maybe that's the thing that I can try to improve for the next time.


Q. The US Open is over; the Davis Cup is almost beginning. When will you arrive to Buenos Aires? What do you think about the series against Argentina?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Well, as I take my time and, you know, do all my stuff what I need to do here, then I will take a plane and go to Argentina. So that's about my way. And what I think, I mean, we play semifinal of Davis Cup. We play with extremely tough opponent. We play in Argentina, which makes the tie even harder, tougher. So, you know, we coming again for to play on clay, which gonna be, you know, something what's probably not ‑‑ or most of us doesn't like ‑‑ but that's how it is, you know. So try to deal with that, try to prepare for it, and actually on Friday gonna be there.


Q. Was there a part of you today that hopes that it keeps raining, that maybe you have to play tomorrow or there might be no wind?

TOMAS BERDYCH: Well, I mean, as I saw the rain in the morning, then, you know, I was like, Why should we come here even for 11:00 when they are expecting the rain, and then we have to wait here until later on? Then, you know, coming actually really early, because then if you have to be ready for 11:00 match, then you have to come here like around 8:00, 8:15, which is quite early. But, yeah, that's how it is. I mean, actually, I'm not a big fan of the schedule like this, so I was hoping that probably maybe the rain is going to stay and then maybe tomorrow the conditions could be different. But this is just if, if. Was like that, and that's how it is.


FastScripts by ASAP Sports











Strong winds force chairs and bags onto the court mid-point at a crucial point in the fourth set





 
 


Tomas Berdych: We should not have played in high winds at US Open


Paul Bewman | THE INDEPENDENT


Monday 10 September 2012


This would not be the US Open without a controversy over the scheduling of matches. Saturday's debate centred around whether there should have been any play at all given the high winds and storms that swept through Flushing Meadows throughout the day.


From the moment the upper tiers of Arthur Ashe Stadium were evacuated shortly before the scheduled start of play because of a tornado – which eventually touched ground only three miles away – it was clear that the weather would be a major factor.


Andy Murray and Tomas Berdych played their semi-final in the most testing of conditions. Play was held up several times because of litter blowing around the court and at one stage the players' chairs were blown on to the court in the middle of a point. While Murray dealt superbly with the conditions in the course of his 5-7, 6-2, 6-1, 7-6 victory, Berdych struggled. The Czech has a particularly high ball toss and frequently had to abort his service action. On one occasion the ball moved so much that Berdych's mishit serve ballooned beyond the baseline


With a severe thunderstorm approaching, David Ferrer and Novak Djokovic followed Murray and Berdych on to court and began their semi-final in even stronger winds. Djokovic in particular was unhappy at playing in such conditions. Play was eventually called off for the day after only half an hour with Ferrer leading 5-2.


The evening session – due to feature the women's final between Serena Williams and Victoria Azarenka – had already been postponed until yesterday. Nevertheless, the tournament could have been completed on time if the Djokovic-Ferrer match had been moved to another court and played at the same time as Murray-Berdych.


Berdych said the conditions had a major impact. "When I'm not able to go for the first serve and I'm not making some straight points from the serve, then that's not my game," the world No 7 said afterwards. "He [Murray] dealt with that much better than I did."


Berdych did not think the match should have been played. "We are here in the States where they really love a show, but this was not about a show," he said. "This was just about somehow trying to deal with the conditions and then trying to put the ball over the net. Sometimes even that was impossible."


Murray was asked whether he agreed that there should be rules governing such conditions. "There are certain rules in tennis that were broken many times today," he said.


"It was sometimes two minutes between points because it was taking so long for us to throw the ball up. Maybe those rules should be enforced a little bit – or not play the matches. But I don't know if they stop in other sports for a lot of wind. When there is a tornado around then that's pretty serious. I think that's the right time to stop."


"There is a skill to playing in the wind. I have never played in it when it's been that bad, but people like to watch professionals struggle when they're in tough conditions."


There has always been pressure here on the final weekend because the scheduling leaves little room for manoeuvre, particularly as there are no retractable covers on any of the courts. The tournament's insistence on having "Super Saturday" – featuring both men's singles semi-finals and the women's final – has led to a Monday men's final for the last five years.


The players, nevertheless, have repeatedly voiced their dissatisfaction over the scheduling, which will be changed next year. From 2013, there will be a day of rest for the men's finalists after the semi-finals, though it has yet to be decided whether the final will be played on the Sunday or Monday.








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